Category Archives: Music Writing and Clips

NYC Hot Jazz Ringleader Dennis Lichtman (from DownBeat, Dec. ’18)

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Clarinetist Dennis Lichtman and friends tear it up every Tuesday night at Mona’s on the Lower East Side. Their album includes a DVD with video of live performances from the club.

At 11 o’clock till “stupid late” every Tuesday night, a little dive bar on the Lower East Side called Mona’s becomes ground zero for New York City’s Hot Jazz revival. It’s all thanks to a marvelous 34-year-old clarinet player from Newton, Mass. named Dennis Lichtman, who started the Tuesday jam back in 2007. Why does he choose to play vintage jazz from the 20s and 30s? See the article from the December 2018 DownBeat here or read the unedited version below.

A decade before he became one of the instigators of New York City’s traditionaljazz revival, Dennis Lichtman was studying music business and clarinet at theHartt School of Music in Hartford and thinking about the future.

“They didn’t teach me to go play at a little dive bar on the Lower East Side that isn’t really a music venue, and to make no money for the first couple of years, and to just have fun, and maybe a scene will coalesce around it that you’ll become known for 10 years later,” he said recently over coffee in his Long Island City, Queens apartment.  “But that’s what happened.”

The little dive bar is called Mona’s, where, since June 2007, Lichtman has been packing them in, leading “Mona’s Hot 4” every Tuesday night between 11 p.m. and “stupid late,” as his website says. The “hot jazz” scene at Mona’s attracts many of the city’s top musicians, who often drop by after their regular gigs. In recent months they have included stars like Cecile McLorin Salvant, Anat Cohen, Chris Thile and Jon Batiste. He has made two live albums there. The most recent of them, 2012’s Tuesdays at Mona’s (www.dennislichtman.com), includes 19 guest musicians and a DVD including a documentary film.

Meanwhile, Lichtman, now 38, has become one of the busiest multi-instrumentalists in town. In addition to his clarinet acumen, he plays fiddle and mandolin in a variety of outfits including The Brain Cloud, a Western Swing band featuring singer Tamar Korn, with whom he has made three albums, and a new old-timey quintet called the Lovestruck Balladeers. In the fall he will tour China (with banjoist Cynthia Sayer) and Israel with his own quintet.

He is also a long-time member (on clarinet) of trumpeter/composer Brian Carpenter’s 11-piece “Ghost Train Orchestra,” which plays “chamber jazz” from the 1930s with crisp, period arrangements but forward-looking soloists.  “I’ve been playing with Dennis for 10 years,” Carpenter said. “He has one of the most stunningly beautiful clarinet sounds in jazz today. And then you find out how old he is and how many other instruments he plays – it’s unbelievable.”

Lichtman’s latest album, Just Cross the River, pays tribute to the “unglamorous” borough of Queens, which, because of its affordability and convenience to Manhattan, was home to more giants of jazz than just about any other place in the country, including Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, Bix Beiderbecke, Fats Waller and Billie Holiday. In August 2018, Lichtman debuted the album with two sold-out shows at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola at Jazz At Lincoln Center. “Madonna came to the first show!” he said, still marveling at the memory.

Unlike most jazz musicians, who want to sound as contemporary as humanly possible, Lichtman is an articulate advocate for earlier styles. Asked why he chooses to play this music, his response is immediate: “I love it. That’s the short answer. The longer answer is that there’s something communal about music from the earlier era of jazz… For me it’s the jazz version of three chords and the truth… the perfect combination of broad appeal and deep sophistication. You can get as nerdy and intricate as you want. But if the rhythm section is thumping, any shmo can walk in off the street and be moved by it.”

And there are plenty of gigs, he said. “In some ways, it might be easier than it is for modern jazz players. Lots of restaurants in New York are interested in having trad jazz. It’s lively and fun, acoustic, not too loud. The standard pay may even be a little higher than for other types of jazz.”

Other musicians occasionally ask him, “with a degree of condescension, ‘Why would you play that stuff that’s 80 years old,’” he said. “When they’re playing something that sounds like Coltrane in 1965. It’s all vintage. It’s America; it’s history, but it’s also part of an ongoing evolution. Pick your starting point and go from there.”

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Filed under Dennis Lichtman, Hot Jazz

Luciana Souza Returns to Her Poetic Ways on New Album (JazzTimes)

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Luciana Souza perusing a copy of Leonard Cohen’s “The Book of Longing.”

Luciana Souza returns with a brilliant album of poetry (by herself, Leonard Cohen, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and others) set to her own spare, haunting music, with guitarist Chico Pinheiro and bassist Scott Colley. My interview with her in Jazz Times.

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Filed under Chico Pinehiro, Luciana Souza, Scott Colley

Queen Mary 2 Jazz Lectures (Playlist 1: The Great Jazz Singers 1950-Present)

Thanks to everyone who attended my jazz history talks last week on the Queen Mary 2 during its voyage from Quebec to Nova Scotia to New York. I got a few requests to post the playlists, so here’s the first one, covering “The Great Jazz Singers (1950-Present).”

Queen Mary - Jazz Lecture

The Great Jazz Singers (1950-Present) Playlist

  1. “A Tisket, A Tasket” – Ella Fitzgerald w/Chick Webb Orchestra (1938).
  2. “Blue Skies” – Ella Fitzgerald (from Get Happy, 1959)
  3. “You Make Me Feel So Young” – Frank Sinatra, w/Count Basie Orchestra conducted by Quincy Jones (live video, 1965)
  4. “Tenderly” – Sarah Vaughan (live video, 1958)
  5. “I Fall in Love Too Easily” – Chet Baker, from Chet Baker Sings (1958)
  6. “Chega de Saudade” – João Gilberto from album Chega de Saudade (1959)
  7. “Every Day I Have the Blues” – Lambert, Hendricks & Ross w/Joe Williams and Count Basie (live video from Playboy’s Penthouse TV show, 1959)
  8. “No Love Dying” – Gregory Porter (live video from CBS This Morning 2013)
  9. “I Wish That I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate” – Cecile McLorin Salvant (live video from KNKX Public Radio, 2014)
  10. “Marrakesh Express” – Accent (video from AccentVocal.com, 2018)
  11. “Look For The Silver Lining” – Tony Bennet & Bill Charlap, promo video for album of the same name, 2015

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Filed under Accent, Allen Morrison, Bill Charlap, Cecile McLorin Salvant, Chet Baker, Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, Gregory Porter, Hendricks & Ross, Joao Gilberto, Jon Hendricks, Lambert, Lectures, Sarah Vaughan, Tony Bennett

Critic’s Notebook: 88-year-old Bebop Master Barry Harris Visits London

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Dr. Barry Harris played classic bebop piano to young fans in London on August 11. (Photo by David Friedman)

Barry Harris Trio at Pizza Express, London

London’s current, healthy jazz scene is benefiting from a new crop of exceptional local talent combined with a surge of interest on the part of younger club-goers. These younger listeners are not only going to hear millennial players – they’re also paying their respects to some of the players of the Millennium.

At least that was the conclusion I drew from the encouraging number of younger listeners present for a recent Saturday night set at Pizza Express Live-Soho by the 88-year-old bebop icon Barry Harris. In a somewhat unlikely turn of events, the Pizza Express restaurant chain has become a leading presenter of jazz in the U.K., with five venues, including this attractive cellar jazz club in the heart of Soho.

Dr. Harris (he was awarded an honorary doctorate by Northwestern University in 1995) was vastly influenced by Bud Powell and Thelonious Monk (who had been a close friend of Harris). Roughly half of the material on this occasion was tunes written or played by the two piano legends. He appeared with his stalwart U.K. rhythm section, bassist Dave Green and drummer Steve Brown.

At 88, Dr. Harris may walk to the stage slowly, but continues to swing with authority, his focus and stamina at the keyboard undiminished. The youthful crowd had come to hear un-reconstructed bebop, pure from the source. Harris favored ballads and mid-tempo songs all night, but swung with increasing authority as the night progressed, with deft, highly attentive accompaniment from Green and Brown.

He began, a little haltingly, with Powell’s “Oblivion,” then found his footing. It’s not so easy to get your motor started at 88, but, once engaged, it ran smoothly, the pianist patting his heel to the mid-tempo swing and humming along with his solo, increasingly audibly as the night went on.

“Over the Rainbow” was a mildly surprising choice for a bebop pianist, but the bebop treatment proved just the tonic to enliven a song that, for all its greatness, can sound trite in a more traditional setting. What Harris initially lacked in polish – his fluency and speed markedly improved in his second set – he more than made up for in soul. Early on, he didn’t always hit every note cleanly, but his note choices were always right. On this song, and the next, George Shearing’s “She,” he played in the unhurried manner of a past master with nothing to prove, both casual and focused. He turned the packed house, in effect, into his living room, as if the audience was eavesdropping.

They hung on his every note as he wrung pathos from each phrase. I couldn’t help but think about Powell and Monk: If they had they made it to this ripe age, would they have sounded similarly reflective, surrendering some precision and flash for the wisdom of age, saying only what was necessary and respecting the silences?

All evening, bassist Green and drummer Brown kept their eyes locked on Harris, as if holding a babe in arms who might fall from their embrace if they looked away. Displaying sensitivity to his every gesture, they listened as closely as humanly possible. Brown had a smile plastered on his face the whole evening, as if he couldn’t believe his good fortune.

Three more Monk tunes followed: the waltz “Ugly Beauty,” “Off Minor” and “Light Blue.” He then offered an elegiac take on Billy Strayhorn’s “Lotus Blossom” before launching into an uptempo “Woody N’ You,” the Dizzy Gillespie warhorse, in the style of Bud Powell. Was his consistent playing behind the beat in the first set intentional or an artifact of old age? There were so many jazz lessons to be had that, in the end, it didn’t matter.

His sprightly original bossa nova, “Nascimento,” proved a palate cleanser. The tune has been covered by Tommy Flanagan and Bobby Hutcherson, among others, but it’s such a “found” melody that it’s remarkable that the tune isn’t better known. With little encouragement, an amen chorus of audience members clapped along and sang “la-las” to the ridiculously catchy melody.

Returning for his second set, Harris seemed somehow younger and more resilient. He began, appropriately enough, with “A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square,” the quintessential London ballad, playing the first chorus solo before the rhythm section joined in at a leisurely pace. Singing along with his solo, he was now locked in tight.

Continuing the sentimental mood, he revived the chestnut “I Left My Heart at the Stage Door Canteen,” a 1942 Irving Berlin tune that featured a melodic and inventive bass solo from Green.

“East of the Sun” followed, swinging gently at a leisurely tempo, then Monk’s famous ballad “Ruby, My Dear,” dead-on. So far in this set, he hadn’t played anything faster than mid-tempo, and proved a total master of his domain.

Calling upon a time-tested bit of show business, he then asked the audience to help him compose a song by picking three numbers from one to eight. Members offered “seven,” “four” and “five.” He considered these numbers for a moment, then announced that the next number would be entitled, “7-4-5 Pizza Express.” (He featured a different version of this tune, called “7-4-3” on his 2003 album Live in New York; only the melody notes were, ever so slightly, different.) The routine calls for the notes to be taken for a spin on a bossa nova framework that changes keys a few times before returning home. It’s all a bit of hocus-pocus requiring a willing suspension of disbelief; it’s fairly obvious that the majority of this song has been pre-composed. No matter. It’s still a delightful tune, whatever three notes the audience suggests.

More ballads followed, Harris sometimes singing a bit, as on “Everything Happens to Me,” where he intoned the poignant last verse, “I fell in love just once, and it had to be with you / Everything happens to me.” On “My Heart Stood Still,” he gently bopped his way through it, in a nod to Powell, who also recorded it.

Another ballad, then, perhaps tiring, he said, “It’s time, isn’t it?  Time is so fleeting.” He wrapped it with a reprise of “Nascimento.” Once again, the audience clapped in time and sang along. Indeed, after the show, some youthful audience members walking down Dean Street could be heard whistling it.

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Filed under Barry Harris, Bud Powell, Thelonious Monk

Aretha Franklin, 1942-2018

Farewell, Lady Soul. And to anyone who has the slightest doubt about her supreme abilities as an improviser in a jazz context, here’s game, set, match. One of the most moving recordings I’ve ever heard. She was beyond category.

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A Memory of Egberto Gismonti at Brazil’s MIMO Festival in 2014

Egberto Gismonti at MIMO Paraty - 2014

Lately I’ve been listening to Egberto Gismonti, one of Brazil’s greatest composers, as I’m working on a piece for DownBeat about a new tribute album to him by virtuoso clarinetist Eddie Daniels. It reminded me of a night in 2014 when I saw Gismonti give a thrilling SRO performance in a church in Paraty, Brazil, as part of the MIMO Festival.  I never got around to posting the article I wrote about that night for DownBeat: here it is.

After the concert, I was invited to go to dinner with him and a group of MIMO staff. He told me about a concert he had given some years earlier attended by his mother and aunt, in which he chose not to play a famous song of his called “Palhaço” (which translates as “Pagliaccio” or “Clown”). As he took his bows, some audience members demanded the song, a fan favorite, repeatedly yelling, “Palhaço, Palhaço!”  His mother and aunt, apparently unfamiliar with the song, took umbrage. Later they told him,  “How can they be so disrespectful! You played so beautifully!” The video below starts slowly, but hang on.

 

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Filed under Brazilian music, Egberto Gismonti, MIMO Festival

Maria Schneider Wins JJA Trifecta

Maria-3 (3)On Thursday night before a packed house at Birdland, I had the privilege of presenting genius composer-bandleader Maria Schneider with three 2018 Jazz Awards on behalf of the 185 voting members of the Jazz Journalists Association. She won for best jazz composer, best arranger, and best large ensemble for the Maria Schneider Orchestra.

If there were an award for best public service by a musician, she might win that as well, for her tireless activism in the fight to get fair compensation for music creators and other artists. It’s a fight that, as Maria will tell you, is far from over.

Maria once told me her favorite compliment that she ever received. A musician friend of hers was driving his 12-year-old son to soccer practice and playing The Thompson Fields on the car stereo. After a few minutes of listening, his son said, “Wow, Dad, I didn’t know there was music that sounded like this.” There is.

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Filed under Jazz Journalists Association, Maria Schneider

Marsalis quintet, plus a few guests named Willie, Bob, Ray and James (DownBeat)

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The blues is the lingua franca on United We Swing: Best Of The Jazz At Lincoln Center Galas (Blue Engine), a new compilation of live performances featuring the Wynton Marsalis Septet. I spoke with Wynton recently about the new album for DownBeat.

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Filed under Blue Engine Records, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, James Taylor, Music Writing and Clips, Ray Charles, Willie Nelson, Wynton Marsalis, Wynton Marsalis

An exciting new jazz songwriter

I caught Alina Engibaryan, a young Armenian-Russian emigre, last night at the Jazz Standard, with a truly all-star band of sax legend Chris Potter, bassist Michael League (her producer), Taylor Eigsti on piano and Kendrick Scott on drums – wow! She occupies the jazz-pop-soul space carved out by artists like Stevie Wonder (think “You’ve Got It Bad, Girl”) and extends it, exploring the jazz implications more deeply. #AlinaEngibaryan #jazz

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Filed under Alina Engibaryan, Chris Potter, Kendrick Scott, Michael League, Taylor Eigsti

Kurt Elling asks “The Questions”

Kurt Elling has always been one of our most cerebral jazz singers, which is not to say he doesn’t swing like a mother. Over lunch and several glasses of Montepulciano at his favorite neighborhood pizzeria on the Upper West Side…

Kurt Elling and me, March 2018

…we talked for nearly three hours about his new album, The Questions (Okeh), which he describes as both a reaction to the era of division and vitriol brought on by the Trump Administration, and an attempt to rise above it and consider more cosmic matters. To that end, the album features shattering, modern interpretations of Dylan’s “A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall” and Paul Simon’s “American Tune;” it also includes lyrics he adapted from favorite poems by Wallace Stevens, Franz Wright, and Rumi, among others. The album, co-produced by Branford Marsalis, is one of my favorite discs of the year. Our discussion appears in the June issue of DownBeatbut you can read it here.

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Filed under Branford Marsalis, Downbeat, Kurt Elling

In Memoriam: Bob Dorough

Bob Dorough at Kitano, 2012

Bob Dorough at Jazz at Kitano, with my friend and fellow Dorough fan Terry King, in August 2012. We were thrilled to meet him.

The great jazz singer, songwriter and pianist Bob Dorough passed away yesterday at 94. Perennially young and energetic, we thought he would go on forever. I saw him give a breezy, masterful performance at Jazz at Kitano four years ago, when he was 90. He sang and played like someone 30 years younger, with his pony tail and that patented Arkansas twang of his that, somehow, added to his hipster image. I interviewed him and reviewed the show for DownBeat. He will no doubt be best remembered for “Schoolhouse Rock,” for which he wrote and recorded many of the songs. But his great songbook also includes the immortal “Devil May Care,” “I’m Hip” (with Dave Frishberg), and “Nothing Like You Has Ever Been Seen Before.” He also holds the distinction of being one of the only vocalists ever to sing on a Miles Davis album (Sorcerer). 

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Bob Dorough meets Cecile McLorin Salvant at the 2015 Newport Jazz Festival (photo: AM).

In August 2015, I witnessed his first meeting with Cecile McLorin Salvant following her performance at the Newport Jazz Festival. He presented her with a folio of some of his songs that he thought she might like. She was thrilled and subsequently added “Devil May Care” and “Nothing Like You” to her repertoire.

“Nothing like him,” indeed.

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Filed under Bob Dorough, Cecile McLorin Salvant

Manhattan Transfer Reboots

Manhattan Transfer, from left: Alan Paul, Cheryl Bentyne, Janis Siegel and Trist Curless (Photo: John Abbott)

I spoke with The Manhattan Transfer’s Alan Paul and new member Trist Curless about the group’s great new album “The Junction,” its first in nearly a decade. It plays like a pop album, but an awfully hip one. Story in DownBeat Magazine.

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Filed under Alan Paul, Cheryl Bentyne, Janis Siegel, Manhattan Transfer, Mervyn Warren, Trist Curless

I moderated a panel at L.I.U.-Post’s “Jazz Day” on March 3

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Joining me in the Career Pathways in Jazz panel were (l-r) Prof. Jeff Lederer; guitarist Al Marino, and drummer Brad Sporkin.

I had the pleasure of moderating a panel discussion on “Career Pathways in Jazz” as part of L.I. University-C.W. Post’s annual “Jazz Day” on Saturday, March 3. Joining me in discussing what it takes to make a career in jazz (and other genres of music) were saxophonist/clarinetist and Post professor Jeff Lederer; recent Post music graduate and working guitarist Al Marino; and my friend, the drummer Brad Sporkin. We also had some great contributions from pianist/bandleader Richie Iacona, also a Post professor.  Thanks so much to Jeff; LIU Director of Music Education Dr. Jennifer Miceli; and University Director of Arts Advancement Brian Hoeflschweiger for inviting me.

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Filed under Allen Morrison, Jeff Lederer, Lectures

Geri Allen’s Spirit Fills Winter Jazzfest During All-Star Tribute

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Trumpeter Ingrid Jensen performs at the star-filled tribute to Geri Allen at Winter Jazzfest in NYC on January 15, 2018. That’s singer Lizz Wright and drummer Terri Lyne Carrington on the left. (Photo: Gulnara Khamatova)

A moving and heartfelt tribute to the great jazz pianist and composer unfolded as a series of highlights by a high-wattage group of players including Terri Lyne Carrington (musical director), Esperanza Spalding, Lizz Wright,  Dee Dee Bridgewater, Helen Sung, Vijay Iyer, Kris Davis, Tia Fuller, JD Allen, Jack DeJohnette, and many more. My review at DownBeat.com.

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Filed under Dee Dee Bridgewater, Esperanza Spalding, Geri Allen, Helen Sung, Jack DeJohnette, JD Allen, Lizz Wright, Terri Lyne Carrington, Tia Fuller, Vijay Iyer

At 56, Wynton Marsalis Reflects on His Induction Into the DownBeat Hall of Fame

Downbeat December 2017 cover

At 56, Marsalis is among the youngest living artists ever inducted into the DownBeat Hall of Fame. If he had only been the leading trumpeter of his generation, there’s little doubt he eventually would have made it into the hallowed hall. But it’s his tireless work as an educator, bandleader, fundraiser, non-profit executive, and advocate for jazz and American culture that probably sealed the deal so soon.  My interview with him, from the December 2017 DownBeat.

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Filed under Aaron Diehl, Jazz at Lincoln Center, Marcus Printup, Music Writing and Clips, Sherman Irby, Wynton Marsalis

A Night at the Blue Note, Rio with Antonio Adolfo and Bossa Nova legend Carlos Lyra

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Antonio Adolfo performs at The Blue Note in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Nov. 11. (Photo: Alexandre Moreira)

Although he may look more like a professor or kindly physician, Antonio Adolfo is, in reality, a killer pianist/arranger and master of samba jazz. In early November, the beginning of summer in Brazil, I went to the beautiful new Blue Note in Rio de Janeiro to get my samba fix.  Adolfo led a septet that features some of the finest jazz musicians in Brazil. And then he introduced his guest, one of the great Bossa Nova singer/songwriters, Carlos Lyra. My story in DownBeat.

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Filed under Antonio Adolfo, Bossa Nova, Brazilian music, Carlos Lyra

Brazil’s MIMO Festival Brings the World to Rio de Janeiro

Didier Lockwood Trio at Igreja da Candalaria, Rio

Didier Lockwood Trio at Igreja da Candalaria, Rio (photo by Beto Figueiroa, MIMO Festival)

Last week’s MIMO Festival-Rio was a musical bazaar including MPB (Brazilian pop), Afro-pop, Portuguese pop, jazz, salsa, and unclassifiable music from around the world. And it ended with a samba explosion to make traditional Brazilian music fans smile. Here’s my review in @DownBeatMag.

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Filed under Brazilian music, Criolo, Didier Lockwood, MIMO Festival

“Another Thing (Outra Coisa)” – Anat Cohen w/Marcello Gonçalves

One of the most acclaimed clarinetists in jazz, Israeli-born Anat Cohen has somehow also managed to become one of the world’s foremost practitioners of Brazilian jazz. If you’d like to expand your appreciation of Brazilian music beyond the usual Bossa Novas, dig this hauntingly beautiful video. Then read my profile of her from the July 2017 DownBeat.

Anat and me
With Anat Cohen, May 2017

 

 

 

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Filed under Anat Cohen, Brazilian music, Marcello Goncalves, Moacir Santos

Marsalis, JLCO Pay Tribute to Jelly Roll Morton

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Pianists Sullivan Fortner (above), Aaron Diehl, Dan Nimmer, and two excellent student pianists from Julliard (Micah Thomas and Joel Wenhardt) rocked the “House of Swing” in “The Fantastic Mr. Jelly Lord,” the JLCO season opener at Jazz at Lincoln Center last weekend.  My review in DownBeat.

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Filed under Aaron Diehl, Jazz at Lincoln Center, Jelly Roll Morton, JLCO, Sullivan Fortner, Wynton Marsalis

Coming soon – my profile of Wynton Marsalis

Photographer: Luigi Beverelli

Today I had the privilege of sitting down with Wynton Marsalis in his dressing room at Jazz at Lincoln Center for a DownBeat interview, five years after our first meeting. We talked about his career, his evolution as a musician and a human being, his hopes for the future.  Article coming soon.

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Filed under Jazz at Lincoln Center, Wynton Marsalis