Separated by 50 Years, Israels, Diehl Find Common Ground (DownBeat)

Bassist Chuck Israels is 82, pianist Aaron Diehl is 33, but they have much in common, as they proved last week at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola at Jazz at Lincoln Center. Last week I did a joint interview with them for DownBeat, then reviewed their show. It was, for me, a personal reunion with both. I had previously profiled Aaron, whom I admire greatly, in Downbeat. The last time I saw Chuck was circa 1976, when, as a scruffy 21-year-old, I took his jazz workshop at SUNY Purchase.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Aaron Diehl, Chuck Israels

New Singers, New Repertoire (DownBeat, Jan. 2019)

Kate Reid

My column from the January 2019 DownBeat reviews five female singers who may be unfamiliar to you (read it here). The best of them, including Kate Reid and Judith Lorick (above and below) are really worth hearing.

Judith Lorick

Leave a comment

Filed under Eric Reed, Fred Hersch, Gayle Kolb, Judith Lorick, Kate Reid, Larry Koonse, Lucia Jackson, Minyeshu, Paul Meyers, Romero Lubambo, Taylor Eigsti

NYC – Still the Jazz Capital (DownBeat, Feb. 2019)

Smalls/Mezzrow impresario and pianist Spike Wilner.

For the lead story on New York City in @DownbeatMag’s 25 Greatest Jazz Cities package (Feb. 2019), I spoke with musicians who run jazz clubs, like Spike Wilner and Matt Garrison (Shapeshifter Lab); other musicians who live here (Anat Cohen, Kurt Elling); and jazz label execs Don Was (Blue Note), Barney Fields (HighNote/Savant), Seth Rosner and Yulun Wang (Pi).  Read it here.

Leave a comment

Filed under Anat Cohen, Barney Fields, Blue Note, Don Was, Downbeat, HighNote Records, Kurt Elling, Matt Garrison, Mezzrow, Pi Recordings, Shapeshifter Lab, Smalls, Spike Wilner

A Before & After Listening Session with Raul Midón (from JazzTimes, Dec. 2018)


Raul Midón (photo: Samuel Prather)

For the December 2018 issue of JazzTimes, I had the enjoyable task of creating a “Before & After” playlist for the multi-talented singer/guitarist/songwriter Raul Midón. Raul and I listened together in a Manhattan recording studio, and he gave me his impressions of the music before and after I identified artists and albums (he guessed the majority of artists pretty quickly). The article at JazzTimes.com includes a Spotify playlist, so you can listen along with us as you read his comments. Raul just earned his second Grammy nomination for his latest album, If You Really Want, a soulful collaboration with arranger/composer Vince Mendoza and the Metropole Orkest, the Dutch jazz orchestra.

Leave a comment

Filed under Jazz Times, Raul Midon

NYC Hot Jazz Ringleader Dennis Lichtman (from DownBeat, Dec. ’18)

tuesdaysatmonas
Clarinetist Dennis Lichtman and friends tear it up every Tuesday night at Mona’s on the Lower East Side. Their album includes a DVD with video of live performances from the club.

At 11 o’clock till “stupid late” every Tuesday night, a little dive bar on the Lower East Side called Mona’s becomes ground zero for New York City’s Hot Jazz revival. It’s all thanks to a marvelous 34-year-old clarinet player from Newton, Mass. named Dennis Lichtman, who started the Tuesday jam back in 2007. Why does he choose to play vintage jazz from the 20s and 30s? See the article from the December 2018 DownBeat here or read the unedited version below.

A decade before he became one of the instigators of New York City’s traditionaljazz revival, Dennis Lichtman was studying music business and clarinet at theHartt School of Music in Hartford and thinking about the future.

“They didn’t teach me to go play at a little dive bar on the Lower East Side that isn’t really a music venue, and to make no money for the first couple of years, and to just have fun, and maybe a scene will coalesce around it that you’ll become known for 10 years later,” he said recently over coffee in his Long Island City, Queens apartment.  “But that’s what happened.”

The little dive bar is called Mona’s, where, since June 2007, Lichtman has been packing them in, leading “Mona’s Hot 4” every Tuesday night between 11 p.m. and “stupid late,” as his website says. The “hot jazz” scene at Mona’s attracts many of the city’s top musicians, who often drop by after their regular gigs. In recent months they have included stars like Cecile McLorin Salvant, Anat Cohen, Chris Thile and Jon Batiste. He has made two live albums there. The most recent of them, 2012’s Tuesdays at Mona’s (www.dennislichtman.com), includes 19 guest musicians and a DVD including a documentary film.

Meanwhile, Lichtman, now 38, has become one of the busiest multi-instrumentalists in town. In addition to his clarinet acumen, he plays fiddle and mandolin in a variety of outfits including The Brain Cloud, a Western Swing band featuring singer Tamar Korn, with whom he has made three albums, and a new old-timey quintet called the Lovestruck Balladeers. In the fall he will tour China (with banjoist Cynthia Sayer) and Israel with his own quintet.

He is also a long-time member (on clarinet) of trumpeter/composer Brian Carpenter’s 11-piece “Ghost Train Orchestra,” which plays “chamber jazz” from the 1930s with crisp, period arrangements but forward-looking soloists.  “I’ve been playing with Dennis for 10 years,” Carpenter said. “He has one of the most stunningly beautiful clarinet sounds in jazz today. And then you find out how old he is and how many other instruments he plays – it’s unbelievable.”

Lichtman’s latest album, Just Cross the River, pays tribute to the “unglamorous” borough of Queens, which, because of its affordability and convenience to Manhattan, was home to more giants of jazz than just about any other place in the country, including Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, Bix Beiderbecke, Fats Waller and Billie Holiday. In August 2018, Lichtman debuted the album with two sold-out shows at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola at Jazz At Lincoln Center. “Madonna came to the first show!” he said, still marveling at the memory.

Unlike most jazz musicians, who want to sound as contemporary as humanly possible, Lichtman is an articulate advocate for earlier styles. Asked why he chooses to play this music, his response is immediate: “I love it. That’s the short answer. The longer answer is that there’s something communal about music from the earlier era of jazz… For me it’s the jazz version of three chords and the truth… the perfect combination of broad appeal and deep sophistication. You can get as nerdy and intricate as you want. But if the rhythm section is thumping, any shmo can walk in off the street and be moved by it.”

And there are plenty of gigs, he said. “In some ways, it might be easier than it is for modern jazz players. Lots of restaurants in New York are interested in having trad jazz. It’s lively and fun, acoustic, not too loud. The standard pay may even be a little higher than for other types of jazz.”

Other musicians occasionally ask him, “with a degree of condescension, ‘Why would you play that stuff that’s 80 years old,’” he said. “When they’re playing something that sounds like Coltrane in 1965. It’s all vintage. It’s America; it’s history, but it’s also part of an ongoing evolution. Pick your starting point and go from there.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Dennis Lichtman, Hot Jazz

Luciana Souza Returns to Her Poetic Ways on New Album (JazzTimes)

luciana-souza-photobyannawebber-edit_web-550x428

Luciana Souza perusing a copy of Leonard Cohen’s “The Book of Longing.”

Luciana Souza returns with a brilliant album of poetry (by herself, Leonard Cohen, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and others) set to her own spare, haunting music, with guitarist Chico Pinheiro and bassist Scott Colley. My interview with her in Jazz Times.

Leave a comment

Filed under Chico Pinehiro, Luciana Souza, Scott Colley

Queen Mary 2 Jazz Lectures (Playlist 1: The Great Jazz Singers 1950-Present)

Thanks to everyone who attended my jazz history talks last week on the Queen Mary 2 during its voyage from Quebec to Nova Scotia to New York. I got a few requests to post the playlists, so here’s the first one, covering “The Great Jazz Singers (1950-Present).”

Queen Mary - Jazz Lecture

The Great Jazz Singers (1950-Present) Playlist

  1. “A Tisket, A Tasket” – Ella Fitzgerald w/Chick Webb Orchestra (1938).
  2. “Blue Skies” – Ella Fitzgerald (from Get Happy, 1959)
  3. “You Make Me Feel So Young” – Frank Sinatra, w/Count Basie Orchestra conducted by Quincy Jones (live video, 1965)
  4. “Tenderly” – Sarah Vaughan (live video, 1958)
  5. “I Fall in Love Too Easily” – Chet Baker, from Chet Baker Sings (1958)
  6. “Chega de Saudade” – João Gilberto from album Chega de Saudade (1959)
  7. “Every Day I Have the Blues” – Lambert, Hendricks & Ross w/Joe Williams and Count Basie (live video from Playboy’s Penthouse TV show, 1959)
  8. “No Love Dying” – Gregory Porter (live video from CBS This Morning 2013)
  9. “I Wish That I Could Shimmy Like My Sister Kate” – Cecile McLorin Salvant (live video from KNKX Public Radio, 2014)
  10. “Marrakesh Express” – Accent (video from AccentVocal.com, 2018)
  11. “Look For The Silver Lining” – Tony Bennet & Bill Charlap, promo video for album of the same name, 2015

Leave a comment

Filed under Accent, Allen Morrison, Bill Charlap, Cecile McLorin Salvant, Chet Baker, Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, Gregory Porter, Hendricks & Ross, Joao Gilberto, Jon Hendricks, Lambert, Lectures, Sarah Vaughan, Tony Bennett